Different Types of Succulents You Won’t Believe Exist (With Pictures)

If you’re anything like me, you have an insatiable curiosity for the weird and wonderful world of plants that fill our planet. Among these botanical marvels exists a group of fascinating, drought-resistant, and peculiar plants known as succulents.

With their captivating shapes, vibrant colors, and ability to thrive in some of the harshest environments, succulents have become the darlings of the plant world. So, fellow green-thumbed explorers, we will embark on a journey to discover a treasure trove of different types of succulents that will surely leave you amazed.

In the following list, you’ll meet the resilient Aloe, the hypnotic Lithops, the quirky Graptopetalum, and many more members of the succulent clan. They may not be as famous as their cousin, the mighty cactus, but they possess all their own charm.

You might find yourself surprised by the diversity and ingenuity of these beautiful plants. And who knows, perhaps you’ll be inspired to welcome a few of these living jewels into your home, creating a little piece of desert paradise wherever you may be.

What Type of Succulent Plant Is Your Perfect Match?

As you delve into the mesmerizing world of succulents, you may wonder which type is the ideal companion for your specific environment and lifestyle. Don’t worry, for the list below will guide you through these gorgeous specimens’ unique preferences and personalities.

If you’re searching for the perfect indoor sidekick, Haworthia is the one for you. They thrive in the cozy environment of your home, adding a touch of green magic to your windowsill or desk. But, for those who reside in chillier, snow-kissed climates, the resilient Sempervivum is eager to brave the frosty outdoors with you.

And, if you find yourself basking in the sun’s warm embrace, the heat-loving Opuntia and Agave are ready to soak up the rays alongside you.

So, discover the succulent that speaks to your heart and home. There are thousands of different types of succulents. May the spirit of botanical exploration inspire you to find the perfect leafy companion.

41 Most Common Succulent Varieties

Ready to explore the captivating world of succulents? We’ve gathered a list of 41 remarkable plants, each boasting unique features and charm. Perfect for seasoned collectors or budding enthusiasts, this list promises to inspire your succulent journey.


1. Adromischus (Adromischus cristatus, Adromischus cooperi)

Adromischus succulent
Adromischus Cristatus

Adromischus, also known as the Plover’s Egg plant, is a group of intriguing small succulents originating from South Africa. With distinctive flat or cylindrical leaves, often adorned with unique patterns, they can make any indoor garden pop.

These peculiar plants prefer well-draining soil, partial shade, and infrequent watering. Be cautious, though, as their leaves can be delicate and break off easily.

2. Aeonium (Aeonium arboreum, Aeonium haworthii, Aeonium kiwi)

Aeonium succulent
Aeonium percarneum 

Hailing from the Canary Islands, Aeoniums are notable for their striking rosette formations and long, branching stems. This genus of captivating plants come in an array of colors, ranging from deep green to rich burgundy.

Aeoniums enjoy bright light and well-draining soil but require protection from frost in colder climates. Interestingly, they are monocarpic, meaning they flower once before the individual rosette dies.

3. Agave (Agave americana, Agave attenuata, Agave parryi)

Agave americana succulent
Agave americana succulent

A symbol of the arid American Southwest, Agaves are bold, architectural plants recognized for their large, fleshy leaves with spiny edges. These sun-loving succulents can tolerate drought and heat, making them an excellent choice for xeriscaping.

While slow-growing, Agaves eventually produce a spectacular flower stalk before they bloom and reach the end of their life cycle. Watch out for their sharp spines!

4. Aloe (Aloe vera, Aloe aristata, Aloe brevifolia)

Aloe aristata succulent
Aloe aristata

Aloe plants are famed for their soothing, medicinal properties, particularly Aloe vera. Ranging from small to large, these versatile succulents sport fleshy leaves arranged in rosettes, often with a toothed edge.

These plants appreciate bright, indirect light and well-draining soil. They also make exceptional indoor companions, with the added benefit of purifying the air.

5. Ceropegia (Ceropegia woodii, Ceropegia sandersonii)

Ceropegia woodii succulent
Ceropegia woodii

Ceropegia, or the “String of Hearts,” is a charming trailing succulent that boasts heart-shaped leaves and unique, lantern-shaped flowers.

This vining plant prefers bright, indirect light and well-draining soil. Ideal for hanging baskets, Ceropegia is the perfect candidate to add an enchanting touch to your indoor or outdoor garden.

6. Corpuscularia (Corpuscularia lehmannii)

Corpuscularia lehmannii succulent
Corpuscularia lehmannii

Native to South Africa, Corpuscularia features plump, geometrically arranged leaves that create a stunning visual effect. This eye-catching succulent prefers bright light, well-draining soil, and moderate watering.

Its compact nature makes Corpuscularia an excellent choice for container gardens, and its drought tolerance ensures it will thrive even in arid conditions.

7. Cotyledon (Cotyledon orbiculata, Cotyledon tomentosa)

Cotyledon orbiculata succulent
Cotyledon orbiculata

Cotyledon, a group of diverse succulents from South Africa, boasts fleshy, uniquely shaped leaves and bell-shaped flowers. These intriguing plants enjoy bright light, well-draining soil, and moderate watering.

Some species, like Cotyledon tomentosa, also known as “Bear’s Paw,” display furry, paw-like leaves that are sure to enchant plant enthusiasts.

8. Crassula (Crassula ovata, Crassula perforata, Crassula tetragona)

Crassula ovata succulent
Crassula ovata

Crassulas, including the famous “Jade Plant” (Crassula ovata), are versatile succulents with thick, fleshy leaves that come in various shapes and colors. These captivating plants are native to South Africa and prefer bright light, well-draining soil, and occasional watering.

They are known for their low-maintenance nature, making them an excellent choice for beginners and experienced gardeners alike. Some species, like the Crassula perforata, or “String of Buttons,” display intricate patterns that add interest to any plant collection.

9. Cylindropuntia (Cylindropuntia imbricata, Cylindropuntia tunicata)

Cylindropuntia imbricata succulent
Cylindropuntia imbricata

Cylindropuntia, often called “Cholla” or “Walking Stick Cactus,” is a group of fiercely spiny, tree-like cacti native to the American Southwest and Mexico. These rugged plants can withstand extreme heat and drought, making them perfect for xeriscaping or desert gardens.

Take caution when handling these succulent types, as their spines can be challenging to remove once embedded in skin.

10. Delosperma (Delosperma cooperi, Delosperma congestum)

Delosperma cooperi Jewel of Desert Ruby" succulent
Delosperma cooperi Jewel of Desert Ruby

Delosperma, commonly known as “Ice Plant,” is a group of ground-covering succulents adorned with vibrant, daisy-like flowers. Hailing from South Africa, these sun-loving plants are drought-tolerant and prefer well-draining soil.

A superb choice for rock gardens, adding a burst of color and texture to the landscape.

11. Dudleya (Dudleya brittonii, Dudleya farinosa)

Dudleya brittonii succulent plant
Dudleya brittonii

Dudleya is a group of rosette-forming succulents native to the southwestern United States and Mexico. With their powdery, silver-blue leaves, they add an ethereal touch to any succulent collection.

These succulent plants prefer well-draining soil, bright light, and moderate watering. They can be sensitive to overwatering, so take care to let their soil dry out between waterings.

12. Echeveria (Echeveria elegans, Echeveria imbricata, Echeveria agavoides)

Echeveria elegans
Echeveria elegans

Echeveria, one of the most popular succulent genera, is prized for its stunning rosettes in a wide array of colors and sizes. These Mexican natives enjoy bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering.

Can be used as eye-catching accents in dish gardens, terrariums, or outdoor landscapes in temperate climates.

13. Euphorbia (Euphorbia milii, Euphorbia tirucalli, Euphorbia resinifera)

Euphorbia milii
Euphorbia milii – Crown of Thorns

Euphorbias are a diverse group of succulents, ranging from small, globular plants to tall, tree-like specimens. Many Euphorbias feature an unusual, milky sap that can be irritating to the skin and eyes, so handle them with care.

These fascinating plants prefer well-draining soil, bright light, and moderate watering. Notable species include the Euphorbia milii, or “Crown of Thorns,” which displays vibrant flowers throughout the year.

14. Faucaria (Faucaria tigrina, Faucaria felina)

Faucaria tigrina succulent plant
Faucaria tigrina succulent plant

Faucaria, or “Tiger’s Jaw,” is a small, clump-forming succulent with fleshy, triangular leaves adorned with teeth-like projections. Native to South Africa, these intriguing plants prefer bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering.

Their unique appearance and ease of care make them a popular addition to succulent plant collections.

15. Fenestraria (Fenestraria rhopalophylla)

Fenestraria rhopalophylla succulent
Fenestraria rhopalophylla succulent

Fenestraria, commonly known as “Baby Toes,” is a charming succulent with small, cylindrical leaves that resemble tiny toes. These peculiar plants are native to South Africa and thrive in bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering.

The tops of their leaves have translucent “windows” that allow sunlight to penetrate, enabling photosynthesis even when partially buried in the soil. Fenestraria’s adorable appearance makes it a delightful addition to any indoor garden.

16. Gasteria (Gasteria bicolor, Gasteria liliputana)

Gasteria bicolor succulent
Gasteria bicolor

Gasteria, a group of slow-growing succulents native to South Africa, features thick, tongue-like leaves often adorned with distinctive patterns. These shade-loving plants are well-suited for indoor gardens, preferring bright, indirect light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering.

The succulent name “Gasteria” is derived from the Latin word for “stomach,” referring to the unique, stomach-shaped flowers these plants produce.

17. Graptopetalum (Graptopetalum paraguayense, Graptopetalum pentandrum)

Graptopetalum paraguayense succulent
Graptopetalum paraguayense

Graptopetalum, also known as “Ghost Plant,” is a group of captivating rosette-forming succulents with a powdery, silver-blue hue. Native to Mexico and the southwestern United States, these plants thrive in bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering.

Known for their easy-going nature and ability to propagate from fallen leaves, making them perfect succulents for beginners.

18. Graptoveria (Graptoveria ‘Fred Ives’, Graptoveria ‘Debbie’)

Graptoveria 'Fred Ives' succulent
Graptoveria ‘Fred Ives’

Graptoveria is a group of hybrid succulents resulting from crosses between Graptopetalum and Echeveria. These alluring plants display a range of colors and shapes, often forming attractive rosettes.

They prefer bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering. Their easy-going nature and striking appearance make them popular choices for succulent enthusiasts.

19. Gymnocalycium (Gymnocalycium mihanovichii, Gymnocalycium damsii)

Gymnocalycium mihanovichii variegata
Gymnocalycium mihanovichii variegata

Gymnocalycium, or “Chin Cactus,” is a group of small, globular cacti native to South America. They are prized for their striking, colorful flowers and low-maintenance nature.

The famous “Moon Cactus” (Gymnocalycium mihanovichii) is often grafted onto a rootstock cactus to create a vibrant, eye-catching display.

20. Hatiora (Hatiora gaertneri, Hatiora salicornioides)

Hatiora gaertneri
Hatiora gaertneri

Hatiora, also known as “Easter Cactus” or “Dancing Bones,” is a group of epiphytic cacti native to the rainforests of Brazil. These unique plants feature segmented, leafless stems and stunning, vibrant flowers.

Hatioras thrive in bright, indirect light, well-draining soil, and higher humidity than most succulents. Their unusual appearance and captivating flowers make them a favorite among cacti enthusiasts.

21. Haworthia (Haworthia attenuata, Haworthia cooperi, Haworthia truncata)

Haworthia attenuata
Haworthia attenuata

Haworthia, a group of small, rosette-forming succulents from South Africa, is known for its distinctive, translucent leaf windows.

These low-light loving plants are perfect for indoor gardens, preferring bright, indirect light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering. They are popular for their intriguing appearance and ability to thrive in lower light conditions than many other succulents.

22. Huernia (Huernia zebrina, Huernia schneideriana)

lifesaver cactus
lifesaver cactus

Huernia is a group of peculiar, low-growing succulents native to eastern and southern Africa. Also known as Lifesaver cactus due to looking similar to the Lifesaver candy. These plants are characterized by their fleshy, angular stems and striking, star-shaped flowers. They prefer bright light, well-draining soil, and moderate watering.

Their unique, often foul-smelling flowers are designed to attract pollinators like flies, making them a fascinating addition to any succulent collection.

23. Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, Kalanchoe tomentosa, Kalanchoe pumila)

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana
Kalanchoe blossfeldiana

Kalanchoe is a diverse group of succulents known for their vibrant, long-lasting flowers and intriguing leaf shapes. These eye-catching plants thrive in bright light, well-draining soil, and moderate watering.

Popular as houseplants, and some species, like the Kalanchoe tomentosa or “Panda Plant,” have fuzzy, velvet-like leaves that add texture and charm to any indoor garden.

24. Lampranthus (Lampranthus spectabilis, Lampranthus aureus)

Lampranthus spectabilis
Lampranthus spectabilis

Lampranthus, or “Ice Plant,” is a group of ground-covering succulents native to South Africa. These sun-loving plants produce a profusion of daisy-like flowers in various colors, creating a stunning display.

Prefers well-draining soil and can tolerate drought, making them an excellent choice for rock gardens or xeriscaping.

25. Lithops (Lithops aucampiae, Lithops lesliei)

Lithops aucampiae
Lithops aucampiae

Lithops, commonly known as “Living Stones,” are small, fascinating succulents native to southern Africa. These plants have evolved to resemble pebbles, allowing them to blend in with their surroundings and avoid being eaten by animals. Lithops prefer bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering, as they are prone to rot if overwatered.

Their unique appearance and ability to camouflage make them a captivating addition to any succulent collection.

26. Mammillaria (Mammillaria elongata, Mammillaria spinosissima)

Mammillaria elongata succulent
Mammillaria elongata

Mammillaria is a large group of small to medium-sized, globular cacti native to Mexico and the southwestern United States. These attractive plants feature dense arrays of spines and produce vibrant, colorful flowers.

They prefer bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering. Their compact size and captivating appearance make them popular among cactus enthusiasts.

27. Notocactus (Notocactus magnificus, Notocactus leninghausii)

Notocactus leninghausii
Notocactus leninghausii

Notocactus, also known as “Ball Cactus” or “Parodia,” is a group of globular to columnar cacti native to South America.

These captivating plants are known for their vibrant, showy flowers and dense, colorful spines. Notocactus prefers bright light, well-draining soil, and moderate watering. Their striking appearance and ease of care make them a popular choice among cacti collectors.

28. Opuntia (Opuntia microdasys, Opuntia ficus-indica, Opuntia basilaris)

Opuntia microdasys
Opuntia microdasys

Opuntia, commonly known as “Prickly Pear” or “Paddle Cactus,” is a group of large, flat-stemmed cacti native to the Americas. These plants are known for their edible fruits and ability to withstand heat and drought. Opuntia prefers bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering.

Their distinctive appearance and hardy nature make them a popular choice for xeriscaping and desert gardens.

29. Orostachys (Orostachys iwarenge, Orostachys spinosa)

Orostachys iwarenge
Orostachys iwarenge

Orostachys, or “Dunce Cap,” is a group of small, rosette-forming succulents native to Asia. These unique plants form tight clusters of triangular leaves, often with a spiral pattern. Prefer bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering.

Their interesting appearance and ability to tolerate cold temperatures make them a popular choice for rock gardens and cold-hardy succulent collections.

30. Pachyphytum (Pachyphytum oviferum, Pachyphytum compactum)

Pachyphytum oviferum
Pachyphytum oviferum

Pachyphytum, or “Moonstones,” is a group of rosette-forming succulents with plump, rounded leaves that come in various colors.

These Mexican natives prefer bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering. Their captivating appearance and easy-going nature make them a popular choice for succulent enthusiasts.

31. Pachypodium (Pachypodium lamerei, Pachypodium geayi)

Pachypodium lamerei
Pachypodium lamerei

Pachypodium, or “Madagascar Palm,” is a group of succulent trees and shrubs native to Madagascar and mainland Africa. These striking plants feature thick, spiny trunks and glossy, green leaves.

Pachypodium prefers bright light, well-draining soil, and moderate watering. Their bold, architectural form makes them a captivating addition to any succulent collection.

32. Peperomia (Peperomia graveolens, Peperomia dolabriformis)

Peperomia graveolens
Peperomia graveolens

Peperomia is a diverse group of small, fleshy-leaved plants that make excellent indoor companions. These plants prefer bright, indirect light, well-draining soil, and moderate watering.

Peperomia’s varied leaf shapes, patterns, and colors make them a popular choice for adding visual interest to indoor gardens.

33. Pleiospilos (Pleiospilos nelii, Pleiospilos bolusii)

Pleiospilos nelii
Pleiospilos nelii

Pleiospilos, or “Split Rock,” is a group of small, rock-like succulents native to South Africa. These fascinating plants have evolved to resemble stones, helping them blend in with their environment.

They prefer bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering, as they are prone to rot if overwatered. Their intriguing appearance and ability to camouflage make them a captivating addition to any succulent collection.

34. Portulacaria (Portulacaria afra, Portulacaria afra ‘Variegata’)

Portulacaria afra
Portulacaria afra

Portulacaria, or “Elephant Bush,” is a group of succulent shrubs native to South Africa. These plants feature small, round leaves on woody stems, resembling a miniature tree.

Prefers bright light, well-draining soil, and moderate watering. Their versatile form and easy-going nature make them popular choices for bonsai, topiary, or in a pot as a low-maintenance houseplant.

35. Rhipsalis (Rhipsalis baccifera, Rhipsalis cereuscula)

Rhipsalis baccifera
Rhipsalis baccifera

Rhipsalis, also known as “Mistletoe Cactus,” is a group of epiphytic cacti native to the rainforests of Central and South America.

These unique, trailing plants prefer bright, indirect light, well-draining soil, and higher humidity than most succulents. Rhipsalis’ unusual appearance and captivating flowers make them a favorite among cacti enthusiasts.

36. Sansevieria (Sansevieria trifasciata, Sansevieria cylindrica)

group of snake plant varieties

Sansevieria, commonly known as “Snake Plant” or “Mother-in-Law’s Tongue,” is a group of striking, upright succulents native to the dry climates of Africa and Asia. These hardy plants are known for their air-purifying abilities and ability to tolerate low light conditions.

Sansevieria prefers well-draining soil, bright to low light, and infrequent watering. Their bold, architectural form and low-maintenance nature make them popular choices for indoor gardens and offices. Most people don’r realize the many different types of snake plants. There are many to choose from in various colors and styles.

37. Sedum (Sedum morganianum, Sedum rubrotinctum)

Sedum morganianum
Sedum morganianum

Sedum, or “Stonecrop,” is a diverse group of succulents with species ranging from creeping groundcovers to upright, shrubby plants.

These adaptable plants are native to various parts of the world and can tolerate a range of growing conditions including direct sunlight / full sun. Sedum prefers well-draining soil, and moderate watering.

Their versatility and attractive foliage make them popular choices for rock gardens, green roofs, or as groundcovers.

38. Sempervivum (Sempervivum tectorum, Sempervivum arachnoideum)

Sempervivum tectorum Violaceum
Sempervivum tectorum Violaceum

Sempervivum, or “Hens and Chicks,” is a group of rosette-forming succulents native to Europe and western Asia. These cold-hardy plants form tight clusters of offsets, creating an attractive, low-growing mat.

Sempervivum prefers bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering. Their hardy nature and charming appearance make them popular choices for rock gardens or cold-hardy succulent collections.

39. Senecio (Senecio rowleyanus, Senecio serpens, Senecio radicans)

Senecio rowleyanus
Senecio rowleyanus

Senecio is a diverse group of succulents featuring a variety of characteristics, from trailing plants to upright shrubs. The most common succulent variety from this genus is the String of Pearls.

These plants are native to various parts of the world and are known for their intriguing foliage and easy-going nature. Senecio prefers bright light, well-draining soil, and moderate watering. Their unique appearance and versatility make them popular choices for hanging baskets, containers, or as groundcovers.

40. Stapelia (Stapelia gigantea, Stapelia hirsuta)

Stapelia gigantea
Stapelia gigantea

Stapelia is a group of low-growing, stem-forming succulents native to southern Africa. These intriguing plants are known for their large, star-shaped flowers, often with a distinct, unpleasant odor designed to attract pollinators like flies.

Prefers bright light, well-draining soil, and moderate watering. Their unusual flowers and captivating appearance make them a fascinating addition to any succulent collection.

41. Yucca (Yucca filamentosa, Yucca rostrata)

Yucca filamentosa
Yucca filamentosa

Yucca is a group of succulent trees and shrubs native to the Americas. These striking plants feature bold, architectural forms with spiky, sword-like leaves and tall, flower-bearing stalks.

This plant prefers bright light, well-draining soil, and infrequent watering. Their dramatic appearance and hardy nature make them a popular choice for xeriscaping and desert gardens.

FAQ

How many types of succulents are there?

There are thousands of types of succulents, with over 60 plant families and 400 genera, each containing multiple species. The exact number is difficult to determine as new species are discovered and hybridized. Some popular succulent genera include Echeveria, Aloe, Crassula, and Sedum.

How to tell different types of succulent plants?

Examine their leaf shape, size, color, and texture to differentiate between various types of succulents. Observe the plant’s growth habit, such as rosette-forming, trailing, or tree-like. Also, consider the native habitat, preferred growing conditions, and flowering patterns. Identifying succulents becomes more accessible with experience and familiarity with common genera like Echeveria, Aloe, Crassula, and Sedum.

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Davin is a jack-of-all-trades but has professional training and experience in various home and garden subjects. He leans on other experts when needed and edits and fact-checks all articles.